Tuesday, 30 October 2007

Doom and gloom for The Bolter



Oh dear! A difficult start to the day - The Bolter's annual check up and vaccination. She thought the day was going along quite nicely as usual - very early morning walk, then back to bed with mum for a snuggle (you have no idea how gritty my bed gets!). Then suddenly Senior Dog appears, puts her paws on the bed and prods around with her nose until she finds the snoozing bump, "Come on, he's got his shoes on, we're going out in the car." Things went downhill rapidly after that. First, the dreaded "basque" appeared (her harness - we thought she'd feel more positive about it if it sounded better) and, after much letting out of buckles, she was squeezed in to it. That chest is deeper than ever, it seems. Then the quivering started. There's not a lot of whippet left in The Bolter, just the bits that make her a relentless hunter and make her look utterly wretched when she's unhappy. She's quite good at looking unhappy, actually: she's the possessor of a firm conviction that the world revolves around her but finds it strangely recalcitrant at times. Why can't she go out in the paddock, ask for snacks at the table, have another yoghurt drop, just pop out for five minutes on her own? (Her nickname originates from the occasion when the 6-month old Bolter, beginning to feel confident about the world, "just popped out" for nearly 8 hours. We were hoarsely and tearfully resigning ourselves to being a one-dog family again when she strolled in with an "are you pleased to see me" expression. I went out next morning and reinforced all the fences for the twentieth time.)

The next bad thing this morning was that Senior Dog discovered she wasn't going. Consternation! she likes going in the car (The Bolter doesn't, considering it a waste of good hunting time) and anyway, it's her job to look after The Bolter, except on a hunt, when TB is definitely in charge. Senior Dog, I might add, was a dear quiet little thing, until her own Senior Dog died, and suddenly she had the responsibility of a very silly puppy, who needs to be protected from other dogs.

As it turned out, the visit to the vet wasn't too bad, if you don't count TB's refusal to be examined unless she was allowed to sit on my husband's knee. And being told she should eat fewer yoghurt drops. Though I don't think it's the yoghurt drops that are the problem, it's the mopping up of anything left over from Senior Dog's tea. More walks would be greeted with delight by both, of course, but they wouldn't help SD's rheumatics. We'll have to persuade TB that a ball is worth chasing, and then find a way of occupying SD's attentions (all balls are hers).

Both dogs are now ensconced in front of the stove, vets and desertions forgotten for another year, and The Bolter is feeling a little more relaxed...

4 comments:

Ann Darnton said...

One of my local tea-shops has a series of cartoons on the wall including one in which a dog is sitting in the back seat of a car with virtually everything possible crossed and repeating the mantra 'Park not Vets, Park not Vets, Park not Vets' perhaps I should buy a copy for The Bolter.

GeraniumCat said...

Oh yes, that's it exactly, though it would be "Dunes not Vets". As you can see from the photo, she has a lot that could be crossed! She spent the rest of yesterday barking at smallest provocation, but she seems pretty perky this morning. Senior Dog found the whole thing so exhausting that she had to retire to bed at lunchtime.

Sally B said...

I most certainly do know how gritty your bed gets, sometimes I consider just turning the bed over to them and camping on the sofa.

GeraniumCat said...

Sally, it's a huge relief to know I'm not the only hopelessly indulgent person, but The Bolter felt the cold terribly as a puppy! Now she just likes her comforts (and when she's really snug and content, she groans, which I find utterly irresistible).